Mohammad Qasaimeh, an NYU Abu Dhabi assistant professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering, said in the release “3D printers provide a simple rapid and low-cost technique for fabricating (microfluidic probes).”

“It’s cheaper to produce, easy to scale up and fast to fabricate—all steps, from design to product, can be made in less than a day,” he said, and as a result, “any science lab with a moderate resolution stereolithography printer will be able to fabricate 3D [probes] on demand and use them to process cells reliably.”

During the study, the research team used two independent microfluidic probe designs, printers and setups to fabricate different types of microfluidic probes. According to the study, both designs featured cylindrical tips and conical necks, while they differed in in their world-to-chip interface.

“Results show that, for most (microfluidic probe) applications, printer resolution artifacts have negligible impact on probe operation, reagent pattern formation and cell staining results,” the study said. “Thus, any research group with a moderate resolution stereolithography printer will be able to fabricate the (microfluidic probe) and use them for processing cells or generating microfluidic concentration gradients.”

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