Home » UAE leads global efforts with sustainable projects in Pacific Islands

UAE leads global efforts with sustainable projects in Pacific Islands

by Dubaiforum

ABU DHABI, 1st November, 2023 (WAM) — The UAE’s renewable energy projects in the Pacific Islands are a groundbreaking example of international cooperation to promote sustainability and climate action. These projects help developing countries achieve energy security, reduce emissions, and protect the future of humanity and the planet.

These projects are reflective of the UAE’s commitment to taking practical action by increasing its investments in the clean energy sector, working alongside developed countries, and expanding its global portfolio to support affected communities through mitigation of the impacts of climate change, adaptation to this phenomenon, and reduction of losses and damages resulting from it.

The UAE-Pacific Partnership Fund has helped the Pacific Islands adopt renewable energy projects to address the challenges of rising fuel costs, import dependency, and securing basic electricity needs, which are essential for sustainable development and societal growth.

The Abu Dhabi Development Fund (ADFD) financed the UAE-Pacific Partnership Fund, which included funding 11 renewable energy projects worth US$50 million. These completed projects contributed to the production of 6.4 megawatts (MW) of clean energy, representing a large proportion of the energy needs of the inhabitants of those islands. The projects in the Pacific Islands achieved the strategic objectives reflected in the national budgets of those countries and the preservation of a clean environment free of carbon emissions. All projects contributed to achieving US$3.7 million in savings from diesel fuel and also worked to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 8,447 tons annually.

Tonga Solar Photovoltaic Power Plant

ADFD financed the construction of a 512-kilowatt solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Tonga at $5 million. The plant, which is the country’s first large-scale renewable energy project, meets about 67% of peak demand and 70% of annual electricity demand in Tonga. The plant provides enough power for about 850 households and helps to reduce the burning of 286,000 litres of diesel fuel and the emission of 724 tons of carbon dioxide annually.

Tuvalu Solar Photovoltaic Power Plant

A 5.8-million-dollar ADFD-funded solar PV plant is helping to support the production of clean energy in Tuvalu. The project includes advanced monitoring technologies to ensure the stability of the electrical grid and enables the solar plant to generate 350 kilowatts of electricity annually. This is enough to power more than 800 homes, helping to reduce the burning of 249,000 litres of diesel fuel worth $298,000 annually and the emission of about 631 tons of harmful carbon dioxide annually.

Fiji Solar Photovoltaic Power Plants

A $4.3 million project funded by ADFD is installing three microgrid solar power plants on Kadavu, Lakeba and Rotuma islands. The plants will meet about 90% of peak demand and 40% of daily electricity demand on each island. The plants will generate a total of 525 kilowatts of electricity annually, which will increase the availability of electricity from 12 to 18 hours per day. The plants will also help to reduce the burning of 259,000 litres of diesel fuel annually and the emission of 722 tons of carbon dioxide annually.

Kiribati Solar Photovoltaic Power Plant

A $4.3 million ADFD-funded solar PV plant is generating 600 kilowatts of renewable energy. The project includes advanced monitoring technologies to ensure the stability of the electrical grid. The plant provides electricity to more than 860 homes and helps to reduce the burning of more than 284,000 litres of diesel fuel annually and the emission of 708 tons of carbon dioxide annually.

Vanuatu Solar Photovoltaic Power Plants

A $4.4 million project consisting of three solar PV plants on the island of Port Vila will meet the annual electricity demand of more than 1,500 homes. The plants will generate 767 kilowatts of electricity annually, which will help to save 452,000 litres of diesel and reduce annual CO2 emissions by 1,020 tonnes.

Samoa Wind Farm

The wind power plant in Samoa, which costs US$5.4 million, is the first large-scale clean energy project with a production capacity of 550 kilowatts. The bespoke design includes cyclone-proof turbines – essential in the region where tropical cyclones are a common weather phenomenon – and optimally leverages favourable wind conditions. Catering to the energy needs of the island that is home to the capital Apia as well as to 75 percent of the country’s population, the wind farm saves 183,000 litres of diesel every year and reduces Upolu’s annual carbon footprint by eliminating over 506 tonnes of CO2 emissions.
Marshall Islands Solar Power Plant

ADFD has financed a $4 million solar power plant in the Marshall Islands. In addition to generating electricity, the 600 kW solar power plant, built on a reservoir near the capital Majuro, increases the water storage capacity of the artificial lake by over 20 per cent. The project saves 236,000 litres of diesel annually and reduces annual CO2 emissions by 652 tonnes.

Palau Solar Water Treatment Plant

A $5 million project has installed three innovative solar-powered water treatment plants in Palau. The project is designed to save large amounts of fuel, worth up to $215,000 annually. The project provides up to 50 cubic meters of drinking water daily. The installation of the plant helps to avoid the emission of 596 tons of harmful carbon dioxide annually.

Solar Photovoltaic Power Plant in Solomon Islands

The $4 million solar power plant in the Solomon Islands has a capacity of 1,000 kilowatts and will help to reduce the country’s reliance on diesel fuel. The plant will generate enough electricity to meet about 10% of the island’s peak demand. The project will also reduce carbon dioxide emissions by more than 1,254 tons annually.

Solar Photovoltaic Power Plant in Micronesia

A $3.9 million project has installed a 600-kilowatt solar power plant in Pohnpei, Micronesia. The project will help to reduce the island’s reliance on diesel fuel by 10%. The project will directly save 317,000 litres of diesel fuel and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 876 tons annually. The project will also help to build capacity and skills in the renewable energy sector by engaging local employees in the construction and operation of the plant.

Ground Mounted Solar Plant in Nauru

The ADFD-funded innovative project has converted a landfill site into a 500 kW solar power plant that recycles waste and generates clean energy using the latest photovoltaic technologies. Benefits include saving 274,000 tonnes of diesel each year and reducing annual CO2 emissions by 758 tonnes.

You may also like

About Dubai Forum

Dubai Forum: your daily source for the latest news from Dubai, the United Arab Emirates, and the broader Middle East region. Our coverage includes updates on people, lifestyle, communities, business, startups, and finance, keeping you informed on all facets of the dynamic Dubai scene. #Dubaicommunities #people #travel #startups #DubaiForum